Tag Archives: Baseball Gods

In the Latest Example of the Baseball Gods Hating Philadelphia, King Felx Will not Pitch Against the Phillies

The surprisingly good Seattle Mariners will make a cross country trip beginning on Monday night to face the unsurprisingly not good Philadelphia Phillies in a three game-series at Citizens Bank Park, and sadly, Felix Hernandez will not be a part of it.

The best pitcher of the last decade and American League Cy Young favorite will only be able to watch from the visitors dugout since he just pitched Saturday night and will not start again until next Friday at Fenway Park against the Red Sox.

Reading this, you’re probably thinking ‘meh, ace pitchers miss teams all the time.’

That is true, but the thing that especially sucks about this situation is Hernandez as of a week ago was on track pitch the final game of the Phillies series.

Hernandez pitched on August 5th, and the Mariners did not have an off day until this past Thursday, the 14th. Rather than pitch on four days rest like normal, Mariners manager Lloyd McClendon shuffled his rotation, which pushed his ace back an extra day.

Instead of going August 5th, August 10, and August 15, he went, August 5th, August 11th, and August 16th.

The first schedule would have put him on track to pitch the Wednesday series finale, but that disappointingly is no longer the case.

If any of that was hard to follow, here’s a link and screenshot of the Mariners recent schedule to illustrate what I just wrote.

Mariners Schedule

I first noticed this a week ago but held off on writing about it hoping for some kind of miracle.

King Felix Screenshot

Felix Tweets

As you can see, a friend of mine who is a Mariners fan provided some hope, but in this instance, McClendon’s aforementioned decision worked against us.

To pour some extra salt on an open wound, Cole Hamels is scheduled to pitch on Wednesday for the Phillies. We could have had Hamels-Hernandez and instead we’re getting Hamels-James Paxton.

Paxton is a pretty nice young pitcher, but he’s not King Felix, who is currently rocking a 1.99 ERA and leading all pitchers in WAR.

If I had to make a list of individual MLB players who I would fork over top dollar to see live, King Felix would be third, trailing only Clayton Kershaw and Mike Trout respectively.

If you are seriously invested in the Phillies right now, you are a better fan than me. I still watch most games, but the broadcasts have kinda turned into background noise while multi-tasking on something else. One of the game’s brightest stars in town, however, would have piqued my interest.

In a way, it would almost be a win-win situation. Either the Phillies beat one of the best (something they accomplished when they were one of the best in 2011) and have a nice memory to take away from a lost season, or you get to say that you saw him dominate in-person.

The Mariners have not been to Philadelphia since 2002, and there is no telling when they will be back again.

If you need a team to root for though with the Phillies out of it, might I suggest them? They are currently a half game back of the second wildcard spot in the American League.

Outside of Robinson Cano and Austin Jackson, there are not a lot of recognizable faces in the everyday lineup, but if they crash the playoff party, their starting rotation could make them the life of the party.

Everyone talks about feeling bad for Giancarlo Stanton wasting some awesome years playing for the Marlins, but he is still only 24 years old. His time will come. The Mariners ace has been dominating since 2005 but hasn’t seen an October yet. This might be his best shot.

Unfortunately, rooting for the Mariners won’t solve our immediate problem. We were one day, one Lloyd McClendon decision away from getting Hernandez-Hamels. An amazing matchup to spice up a dull August will not come to fruition.

Another disappointment in a season of them. This time though, you can’t blame Ruben Amaro, although I’m sure some people will still find a way.

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Cliff Lee Got Hurt and Everything Sucks

Everyone who would potentially care about Cliff Lee getting hurt already knows that Cliff Lee got hurt last night. I realize that I’m not telling you anything groundbreaking here.

When I introduced this blog, I made it a point to say that despite my previous experience covering sports it wouldn’t be branded as up to the minute sports news.

One of the advantages to operating it how I currently am is that it affords me the luxury of time when I want to reflect on something or maybe go deeper on a topic rather than spitting out a short, immediate take.

I find that when teams go as south as the Phillies have gone, one begins to identify better with individual players on the club than the entity itself. The final result might not matter a whole lot in those situations, but the players you care about still do.

Sometimes things get so bad where a late July game turns into background music while multi-tasking, almost an afterthought until something awful catches your eyes and ears.

When a frustrated and distraught Lee pointed to his elbow and removed himself from a baseball game last night in the third inning, my first thought wasn’t ‘There goes Cliff Lee’s trade value and the Phillies’ August plans.’ Instead it was ‘There goes Cliff Lee, I wonder if I will ever see my favorite pitcher again.’

That approach might be considered overly sensitive by some. When I covered Penn State football, a few people who were known to dislike my coverage thought I was too soft. They wanted a whipping boy every time a game was lost, and while I’m all for holding people accountable and believe I did that, demanding weekly firings wasn’t my style.

On another level, watching the injury unfold made me think about Ryan Howard’s controversial “Want to trade places?” line from a week ago.

Upon first hearing this, most people would probably utter some variation of “HELL YEAH!” When I slow down and think more about it though, it’s a difficult question for only being four words long.

It’s complicated to ponder for me because I point back to what happened less than 24 hours ago. At age 35, Lee’s elbow may have stopped him from doing what he does best. Certainly they are well compensated, but returning to Howard’s question, I’m not sure how I feel about a primary career ending before age 40. Average Joe’s may never have that financial security but also don’t see some of their best attributes erode so quickly.

I don’t have the answers; I just find it interesting to discuss.

What I do know is that if last night was the end for Lee, he deserved better. It is becoming increasingly likely that one of the greatest playoff pitchers of this generation will never see another October.

I don’t want this to completely go the route of eulogizing Lee’s career. He insisted after the game that he simply re-injured the flexor pronator muscle that cost him two months of the season.

Ruben Amaro said earlier this afternoon that there is no evidence of ligament damage. On the opposite side of that good news, he mentioned that Lee would likely see Dr. James Andrews at some point. A visit to Andrews doesn’t mean a pitcher is on track for major surgery, but the name Amaro uttered might be the scariest three words when it comes to sports injuries.

Hopefully this is indeed just a strain and Lee, who averaged 6.5 WAR a season and a 2.89 ERA between 2008-2013, comes back next April good as new, but one has to be realistic.

Think back to Roy Halladay in 2012 and 2013. If one of the hardest working and best-conditioned pitchers the game has ever seen cannot overcome a shoulder injury, that doesn’t leave a ton of hope for others, Combine that example with the Tommy John epidemic sweeping baseball, and it becomes easy to understand the pessimism.

I have been told by people over the years who would know that Lee is kind of a dick to deal with. Every time I hear it, I proceed with a combination of ignorance is bliss and ‘Alright, maybe he is a dick, but he’s our dick’ mindset. Never in any sort of trouble, I had no reason not to love him.

Even though you learn quickly that athletes have plenty of flaws, actually hearing evidence of them and seeing one of your heroes reduced to a mortal can be tough to come to grips with.

Lee earned better, but unfortunately this movie has plenty of previous editions. For as much press and fanfare as Mariano Rivera and Derek Jeter’s yearlong farewell tours have received the past two years, there are tons of players every year who aren’t afforded the opportunity to go out on their own due to injury or ineffectiveness, and in some cases both.

Baseball isn’t fair, and last night shortly before 8 p.m. eastern time was another sad reminder of that cold, hard truth.

Lee didn’t need or merit a Rivera or Jeter retirement party, but he deserved far more than walking off the mound yelling “Fuck” on a random Thursday night in Washington D.C with many Phillies fans not even watching.

The baseball gods show no mercy, and last night, they came for Lee’s elbow, zapping him of a once golden arm. What a cruel game sometimes, man.

I want to say this isn’t goodbye, Cliff. It’s see you later, hopefully with a few more memories and a well-deserved standing ovation next spring at Citizens Bank Park, but unfortunately I lost my innocence when it comes to knowing the career trajectory of a baseball player a long time ago.

Right now, it is hard to believe that aforementioned wish with much conviction.